Professor Richard Sullivan

Professor, Cancer and Global Health at Kings College London, Director, Institute of Cancer Policy and the Centre for the Study of Conflict & Health
Professor Richard Sullivan, Kings College London

Professor Richard Sullivan

Professor, Cancer and Global Health at Kings College London, Director, Institute of Cancer Policy and the Centre for the Study of Conflict & Health
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Biography

Richard Sullivan is Professor, Cancer and Global Health at Kings College London, Director, Institute of Cancer Policy and the Centre for the Study of Conflict & Health. Richard is a Fellow of the European Academy of Cancer Sciences, WHO NCD Expert and Humanitarian Civil – Military board member for Save the Children, as well as past UK Director of the Council for Emerging National Security Affairs (CENSA) a national security think-tank, and board member of the Union for International Cancer Control.

Richard qualified in medicine, and trained in surgery (urology) gaining his PhD from University College London. He was clinical director of Cancer Research UK for nearly ten years. He has led programs for the UN, OSCE and other organisations in global health and post conflict health reconstruction in many parts of the world. His most recent work has been focused on the basic package of health services in Afghanistan, civil-military co-operation in health in South Sudan, polio eradication and insecurity in Pakistan, and use of health intelligence in high security disease outbreaks following a deployment to Liberia during the Ebola outbreak. His personal research interests range from global cancer systems, particularly issues of affordability and cancer systems, through to surgical models of care in resource-constrained environments; currently the use of VR technologies for gynae cancer surgery in Zambia. Richard has led eight Lancet (Oncology) Commissions most recently Global Cancer Surgery, and is currently working on the Lancet Commissions for Pathology and Childhood Cancers, as well as major programs around value and cancer.

Sessions by Professor Richard Sullivan